Spotlight On: Euphemia

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Before discovering Euphemia, I assumed if Effie had a long form, somehow it wouldn’t do the short form justice.

Effie’s appeal lies in its ability to be sweet and smart, homey and exotic, old-fashioned and modern, like a cross between Millie and Ione.

And when a nickname has that many selling points, I can understand why some people skip over the formal version and make the diminutive the baby’s official name.

But I’m one of those people who isn’t satisfied with just a good nickname. I don’t think I’m alone in wanting a good nickname to have an equally good formal version.

As it happens, Effie can have a few formal versions.

Of Effie’s many possible long-forms, Josephine, Fiona, and even Elizabeth, the most natural is Euphemia, a name sounding almost like the words “ephemeral” or “euphemism” .

The name means something like “well-spoken”. Other possible meanings are: “to speak well” or “fair speech.” The eu prefix is Greek for good, new or well.

And this eu prefix may be the name’s modern downfall.

Eu-name such as Eugene, were fashionable at one point, but have been out of fashion for a while.

Euphemia even visited the bottom of the top 1000 over a century ago. It peaked at #770 in 1881. Its last year in the top 1000 was 1903.

Eu-names are hard to find on babies born in 2014. And yet the FEE sound, also found in top girl name Sophia and fashionable Fiona (#209 and rising) could make the name a slight possibility.

There’s also the Greek origins, found in just outside the top 10 Chloe and fashionable Daphne (only at #420 but rising) and Phoebe (#303).

The similar Seraphina may not be in the top 1000 yet, but as a celebrity baby name (thanks to Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck who used the Serafina spelling for their second daughter) the name has loads of potential.

And these Greek names all have a fashionable digraph, the ph, also found in top girl name Sophia.

Euphemia has much in common with another Spotlight name, Phaedra.

Euphemia may not be appreciated by the mainstream yet, but it deserves a place on UBN.

In fact, Euphemia could revive other eu-names, such as these:

Eudora
Eudoria
Eugene
Eugenia
Eugenie
Eula (or Eulah)
Euna
Eunicia
Eura
Europa
Eustace
Eustacia

There is also the Eufemia variation.

Perhaps a parent has to be pretty bold to name their daughter Euphemia (or Eufemia) in 2014. Neither spelling can be found in the US Social Security data, meaning there were fewer than 5 born in the entire US in 2012.

But if you like Euphemia, I feel the name is a managed risk, and I would use it.

For those not quite ready to take the risk and use it as a first name, Euphemia has the same four-syllable stress on the second syllable pattern as Elizabeth, making it a great middle name.

But note the first African-American woman mathematician, born Martha Euphemia Lofton, rarely used Martha. Other notable Euphemia’s include a Christian saint, and an anime character, Euphemia li Britannia.

Euphemia’s credentials can give it some familiarity and manage its risk-factor.

Being a baby name pioneer means appreciating eu-names when the rest of the country is still in love with el-names, but US parents will rave about eu-names eventually. I can feel it.

And Euphemia could lead the way.

Readers: What do you think of Euphemia?

Photo Credit: G.OZCAN via Compfight cc

Comments

  1. Ruth Lafler says:

    I went to school with a boy whose younger sister (born in the early ’60s) was named Euphemia. Her father was African-American, so it’s interesting there’s an African-American connection. Her mother was Filipina and Euphemia actually went by “Buena” (which of course also means “good”).

  2. I came across a baby Effie once who was named Epiphany, a name I like better than Euphemia.

    There is a very well known send up character from Australian TV called Effie, I think she hurts the name quite a bit!

  3. Stumbled across this post – just wanted to say that my middle name is Eugenia, and I’ve always loved it. I’ve never met another!

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