How To Find A “Golden Mean” (Compromise) Name

boy-balancing-rocksOne very common predicament among expectant parents is when the two parents can’t agree on baby names. Often one parent likes traditional names, while the other likes modern meaning names, as an example. In my research, I have come across a few names that seem to suit conflicting tastes.

Putting these names together in one place seemed like a good idea. I call these names “golden-mean” names. Boys are coded blue, girls are coded pink and unisex are coded green.

Ardenone of our 1930s inspired names.
Brycethe Brice spelling might seem more masculine to some people.
Clive
Colin
Coral  one of our surprising jewelry and gemstone names, which combines the vintage style of Cora with the more whimsical modern style of a nature name.
Cormac
Daria
Dylan
Easton
Eden
Evan
Gina
Grayson
Heath
Ian
Jasperthis one may not have mass appeal, but was chosen because it sounds modern yet also has a history, being in use since the middle-ages. This was a name of a Mayflower passenger.
Jesse
Kyle
Laine
Lance
Lara
Lia
Logan
Mason
Mila
Morgan
Nolan
Noor
Owen
Perry
Pierce
Quincy
Rafe
Reid
Rhett
Ronan
Ross
Rowan
Shea
Sheridan
Silas
Sonia
Tobin
Vaughn
Willa for when one parent loves Willow, and the other wants something more traditional.
Zara

Sometimes compromise names don’t cause that spark of excitement the way a favorite name might. At this point parents must decide which is more important:

  1.  That both parents can live with their child’s name or
  2. One parent loves their child’s name while the other barely tolerates it.

As you look at this list you may notice some patterns. Some of these patterns are also common among names of the moment. The bad news is golden-mean names aren’t often bold taste-makers (but never say never, there are exceptions). The good news is if you are concerned about your child’s name becoming trendy, one big red flag is when a name causes that spark of excitement. If you are asking yourself why no one else is using an amazing name, chances are you are not alone.

With that said, here are the handy patterns and formulas you can use to spot a golden mean name:

For boys, most n-enders fit the bill as well as many (but not all) one syllable names.

For girls, look for “mini-names” with three to four letters and two syllables that follow these formulas:

[Insert consonant] + ia
Examples: Lia and Mia

[Insert consonant] + [pick one of these vowels: a, i, o]i + [pick one of these consonants: l, n, r] + a
Examples: Gina, Mila, Lara and Zara

For both sexes, surname-names work. Unisex names sometimes work, but if one parent likes girly names, they may not be the best choices; one of the “mini-names” might work better.

If you find yourself locked in heated debate with your partner over your baby’s name, maybe this list and formulas will make good starting points. Or maybe one of you will come around. Or at least agree to a beloved name in the middle spot.

Readers: Instead of voting on every “golden-mean” name, we’re going to vote on a different question for the poll. The poll question is: When parents can’t agree on a name, which situation is better: one parent loves the name and the other lives with it or both parents like the name enough?

Feel free to discuss your favorite “golden-mean” names or suggest other “golden-mean” names in the comments.

 

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Comments

  1. There are also online baby name compromise tools like this one:

    http://www.babynamester.com/compromise/settle/babyname/disagreement

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